Be the change you want to see in this world

"Be the change you want to see in the world."
-Mahatma Gandhi

Saturday, June 28, 2008

Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera speaks about the importance of language development at the University of Guam’s Annual Regional Language Arts Conference.



Language is Essential

By

Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera


Early language begins at birth. Children gradually gain proficiency in language at different stages. These stages are critical to language development, and are inclusive of specific domains. These domains -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- are essential, because it allows us to communicate ideas from one person to another.

As we enter the technology age, communication can also be done using e-mail, discussion boards, blogs, Listserv, video conferencing, and more. In fact, I’m using this blog tool to communicate with you, so that I can share ideas dealing with language.

In particular, I’d like to focus on the languages spoken in the Asian Pacific region. Asian Pacific Americans represent many different ethnic groups, each with their own language and culture. More specifically, here are some ways to say "Hello" in the respective different languages and locations:


LANGUAGE

WHERE THIS LANGUAGE

IS OFFICIALLY SPOKEN

HELLO GREETING

Chamorro

Guam, Saipan, Rota, Tinian

Hafa Adai

Tagalog

Philippines

Kumusta

Pohnpein

Pohnpei

Kaselehlie

Chuukese

Chuuk

Ran Annim

Kosraean

Kosrae

Tuwoh

Yapese

Yap

Mogethin

Palauan

Palau

Alii

Majel

Marshall Islands

Yokwe

Hawaiian

Hawaii

Aloha

Japanese

Japan

Konnichiwa

Korean

Korea

Anyounghaseyo

Mandarin

China

Ni hao

Taiwanese

Taiwan

Pengan

Thai

Thailand

Sawatdee

Vietnamese

Vietnam

Xin chao

Malaysian

Malaysia

Helo

Indonesian

Indonesia

Halo

Hindi

India

Namaste

Tuesday, June 24, 2008



Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #5 titled Typhoons. Enjoy!

Typhoons

Typhoons…
Those strong, turbulent mangló*
That strike with no remorse
Frequent our island year after year.
Some of the typhoons that I recall include
Karen, Pamela, Gay, Sharon, Olive, Wendy, Omar,
And there’s even Paka, Cha’ta’an, and Pongsona.
Though these typhoons
Have dampered our spirits with its destruction
We, as a people,
Unite together as one
To pick up the pieces
To rebuild our lives
With undying support from each other.
So though typhoons come and go
I love my island of Guam
For I possess that island spirit
That will never fade.
Even if typhoons come along the way
I know one thing is for sure –
I love my island forever more!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*mangló: winds


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #4 titled Singing. Enjoy!

Singing

Kuma kanta* is a way of life for us
Whether it be to sing magof pot triste songs.
Chamorro fishermen sing songs to bring them luck
And the Chamorro lovers
Would sing songs that warm the heart.
We sing songs in our churches
In our storytelling, fiestas, and dancing, too.
Our songs reflect how we feel
And can sometimes point out a moral
As we sing songs
That are deeply meaningful to our heart!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Kuma kanta: singing
*magof pot triste: happy or sad

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Sunday, June 15, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #3 titled Guahan. Enjoy! Biba Guahan!

Guahan

My beautiful island of Guahan*,
Where America’s Day Begins
Is one I naturally hold dear to my heart.

Growing up on the island
Has made me appreciate
Our beautiful taotao*, tano*, yan tåsi*
It has made me value my Chamorro culture
Filled with family gatherings
Filled with beautiful songs to sing and enjoy
Filled with a rich history
Filled with strong traditions
But most of all,
filled with memories to last a lifetime.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao
*Guahan: Guam
*taotao: people
*tano: land
*yan tåsi: and ocean
Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao
Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and her ED894 students completed a six-day course on May 14 sponsored by the GEAR UP Program entitled, “Navigating into Educational Technology: Building a Multicultural Web Site,” at the University of Guam’s compter science lab. Front row, from left: George Pereda, Rivera, and Doreen Pereda. Second row, from left: Martha Tenorio, Gemma De Guzman, Sophia Duenas, Maria Leon Guerrero, Linda Taitano, Barbara Quinata and Dolores Camacho. Back row, from left: Loring Cruz, Tom Terlaje, Dan Tomada, Shelly Taisipic and Juana Hormillosa.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The following is a poem I wrote that is meant to be inspirational for educators to be abreast of the wonderful world of technology. It invites educators to embrace technology, so that they can enhance their instruction, and so much more.

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

E ducational Technology
D ives into a wonderful world of opportunity
U sing technology as a tool that
C aptures the interest of all who
A ct upon the unique needs of our students.
T eaching them effectively by
I ntegrating technology in the curriculum
O pens a global outreach to all by
N avigating with ease
A s communication is enhanced with
L inks that can assist you with a touch of a button, anyday, anytime.

T eaching
E ducational Technology
C an facilitate learning in the classroom by
H olding resources that can reinforce skills as we
N avigate
O n the threshold of our Technology Age.
L earning is enhanced with
O pportunities and information resources that
G ive our education a significant boost
Y ou and I can learn from and be proud of!
© mnrivera

Here are some insightful thoughts that you may or may not know about literacy. Enjoy!

Did you know?

by

Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera


*The foundation for the love of reading and writing begins at an early age at home.

*Parents are a child’s first and most influential teachers.

*If the adults in the home don’t read or write, the children are not likely to pick up the reading and writing habit.

*Early literacy skills are the foundation for all future learning.

*Something magical happens when a child reads the right book at the right time. If a child finds that a character in a book suffers from the same fears as his own, then he knows that he is not alone in life.

*Children learn to become better readers and writers by engaging in reading and writing.

*Reading helps to develop one’s imagination. No new inventions or designs would ever be created without imagination.

*Those who have difficulty in reading and writing in the primary grades tend to remain behind in their academic studies.

*No single reading program is a quick fix. Use a variety of positive literacy strategies to enhance a child's reading experience.

*Rhyme, rhythm, and repetition of stories make predictions easier.

*Immersing a child in oral language activities positively facilitates language acquisition.

*Using prior knowledge and context to predict enriches a child’s reading and writing experience.

*Responding positively to a child’s attempts to read and write enhances literacy.

*Quality time is essential. Take the time to enjoy reading with your child!

*Above all, TOGETHER, WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE! A genuine partnership in a child’s reading and writing experience only leads to literacy success.
The following is an inspirational piece that a friend of mine shared with me, and I’d like to pass it on to you.

RAINBOWS

One day at a time.....Life is a Gift
Think about this. You may not realize it, but it's 100% true.

1. At least 2 people in this world love you so much they would die for you.
2. At least 15 people in this world love you in someway.
3. The only reason anyone would ever hate you is because they want to be just like you.
4. A smile from you can bring happiness to anyone, even if they don't like you.
5. Every night, SOMEONE thinks about you before they go to sleep.
6. You mean the world to someone.
7. If not for you, someone may not be living.
8. You are special and unique.
9. Someone that you don't even know exists, loves you.
10. When you make the biggest mistake ever, something good comes from it.
11. When you think the world has turned its back on you, take a look. You most likely turned your back on the world.
12. When you think you have no chance of getting what you want, you probably won't get it, but if you believe in yourself, probably, sooner or later, you will get it.
13. Always remember the compliments you received. Forget about the rude remarks.
14. Always tell someone how you feel about them; you will feel much better when they know.
15. If you have a great friend, take the time to let them know that they are great.

Friday, June 13, 2008

Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao have written their cultural anthology titled Our Native Daughters' Reflection of Guam and Its People based on their personal experiences and research on Guam’s rich history. Pictured L-R: Gumataotao and Rivera.


Hafa Adai! Just thought I'd share the following article I wrote regarding the preservation of the Chamorro culture:



Preserving Guam’s Culture through Literature

In an effort to preserve ideas, thoughts, and personal reflections of the island’s Chamorro culture, Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao formed the Korasón Organization to carry out cultural projects that they hold dear to their korasón, (Chamorro word for “heart”). With the support of the Guam Humanities Council, they were awarded a grant to complete their cultural anthology titled, Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People.

They hope that you will enjoy their cultural anthology composed of poems they have written based on their personal experiences and research relative to the island’s history and its connection with the Guam community. A common identity we share with our Pacific Islanders is our rich oral society filled with plentiful stories, legends, and other important values shared throughout generations. This anthology will continue to preserve such stories. It is a resource one can read to learn more about Guam and its people, including its rich culture and the traditions that give us a better understanding, in creatively woven lines of poetry, ultimately resulting to meaningful connections fellow islanders share.

There are fifty seven cultural topics explored in the anthology, such as familia, fiesta, fishing, flores, funerals, Guahan, kelaguen, lancho, Latte stones, manamko, nana, tata, typhoons, weaving, and so much more.

Rivera, an ESL teacher/coordinator in the Guam Public School System and adjunct for the University of Guam, is the project director and co-author of the anthology. Gumataotao, who is also a GPSS ESL teacher/coordinator, serves as the traditional teacher and co-author for the project. The anthology project’s scholars include local authors Joaquin Nangauta Naputi and Marilyn Camacho Salas. Naputi, who is also an agriculturalist, has written books dating back to the 1970’s, including the Island of Guam Coloring Book and Island of Guam Cookbook. Salas has written books such as, Lepblo Para Tane’ Famagu’on I Isla: A Chamorro Interactive Book for Island Children and Chamorro Word Book.

The Korason Organization, in conjunction with the Guam Humanities Council, held a cultural exhibit on December 11, 2004 to showcase the anthology at the Hagåtña Public Library. Copies of the anthology were also provided to the Guam Humanities Council, Guam Public Library System, Micronesian Area Research Center, and the University of Guam’s RFK Library. The poems can also be viewed on Rivera’s PDN blog.

Rivera and Gumataotao hope that by reading their poems, you can grasp cultural identity from within yourself and be enlightened. They have reflected on their personal experiences, researched, and interviewed family and friends, to enable the people of Guam to better understand the island’s history, its cultural significance, and its social environments, through their eyes. Hence, the project’s title, Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People. This anthology project is certainly a labor of love that they have committed themselves to, but it is well worth the time invested, especially knowing that it will serve as a cultural resource for generations to come.

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #2 titled, Sites to Visit. Enjoy! Biba Historia!

Sites to Visit

Historical sites that tell of the island’s past
Can be visited In the northern and southern parts of our island
Including places like the Latte Park and Fort Soledad
Which I’m sure you will agree
Are filled with much natural beauty
That you would love to visit time and time again.
Biba Historia!*
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Biba Historia!: Hurray History!

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Wednesday, June 11, 2008


Hafa Adai! In an effort to preserve ideas, thoughts, and personal reflections of our Chamorro culture that we hold dear to our korasón (heart), Lois Taitano Gumataotao and I naturally formed the Korasón Organization. As part of our organization’s mission, we have spearheaded the creation of a cultural anthology with much love and cultural pride. We hope that you will enjoy our cultural poems, which will be shared on my blog. The poems written are based on our personal experiences and research relative to the island’s history and its connection with the Guam community. A common identity we share with our Pacific Islanders is our rich oral society filled with plentiful stories, legends, and other important values shared throughout generations. It is our mission to continue to preserve such stories, including our island’s rich culture and traditions, in creatively woven lines of poetry, ultimately resulting to meaningful connections fellow islanders share.

It is our hope that by reading our poems, you can grasp cultural identity from within yourself and be enlightened. We have reflected on our personal experiences, researched, and interviewed family and friends, to enable the people of Guam to better understand the island’s history, its cultural significance, and its social environments, through our eyes. Hence, the project’s title, Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People. We especially would like to thank the Guam Humanities Council, as it provided us the means to further carry out our cultural project. Our collection of cultural poems is certainly a labor of love that we have committed ourselves to, but it is well worth the time invested, especially knowing that it will serve as a cultural resource for generations to come. Continue to visit my blog, as I will post various cultural poems that I’m sure you’ll enjoy! Un Dangkulo Na Si Yu’os Ma’ase!

Sinseramente,

Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera


Here’s the first poem I’d like to share regarding our island’s refreshing cool waters! Enjoy! Biba Tåsi!

Tåsi

The bay and the tåsi* - Another meaning for fun.
The refreshing cool waters – For the enjoyment of all.
This all sounds good on a day so hot and humid
For it is a valuable source that’s sure to be sought.
To float in the water and feel the rippling waves
Will tempt you to splash and swim there all day.
Underneath the sparkling blue water you will see
The amazing sea creatures living in harmony.
The guihan*, dolphins, haggan*, and whales
Make fascinating underwater trails.
Beautiful waters include the Hagatña River
And the Talofofo Falls which is just as grandeur.
You’ll also find fishing boats and ships
That sail the horizon,
Traveling gradually with ease.
Yet one particular beautiful water creature
I’m reminded of Is the legendary Sirena who loved to swim
In the water all day.
Sirena found the water to be heavenly
And it’s no surprise
Because of its wondrous beauty.
So take the time to visit Guam’s waters where
You can happily swim and enjoy nature at its best.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*tåsi: ocean
*guihan: fish
*haggan: turtle

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao






Thursday, June 05, 2008

We all know that our health is vital, so it’s important to take good care of ourselves. Of course, that’s easier said than done. I know what to eat and avoid, yet for some reason I find myself in a bad habit of binging the “good stuff” (junk food). I know that I should exercise on a daily basis, yet many times I find an excuse. Does this all sound familiar to you? Well, I aim to do a better job by leading a healthier lifestyle. Will it work? Well, I’m hopeful, and I will certainly do my best! Wish me luck!
By the way, here’s a poem about health that I hope you’ll enjoy:
Your Health
Live each day with care,
And take time to smell the fresh air.
Don’t overwork yourself –
Take care of thyself.
Eat the right foods,
For it does affect your moods.
If you have a problem, tell a friend you trust,
For you’ll feel better at the end.
Exercise each day,
In a suitable way.
Get enough sleep,
But don’t oversleep.
Remember that your health,
Is your greatest wealth.
©mnrivera