Be the change you want to see in this world

"Be the change you want to see in the world."
-Mahatma Gandhi

Tuesday, December 30, 2008




Happy New Year! May the year 2009 bring you many blessings filled with much love, joy, peace, and happiness!


Saturday, December 27, 2008
















Pictured L-R: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivers his "I Have a Dream" speech, in Washington D.C., Aug. 28, 1963; and President-Elect Barack Obama takes the stage at Denver's Invesco Field.

Image source: AP Photos, abcnews.com

TO THE POINT: UOG’s Association for Childhood Education International is sponsoring an island-wide poster contest in recognition of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Celebration. The contest theme is Fulfilling the Dream. It is open to all school children in K-12 grades.


No person in the entire history of African America has made as great an impact on the nation as did Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. – a preacher, civil rights advocate, moral leader, idealist and realist.Since many young people had not yet been born during Dr. King’s lifetime, and may be too young to remember, it is our duty as a community of parents and educators to teach our children of the life and work of Dr. King.

In addition, Barack Obama, will be the nation’s first African American to be elected president of the United States. As America’s 44th president, the 47 year-old junior senator from Illinois now must bear the hopes of an entire race, live up to the expectations of an entire nation and lead the free world in a time of great uncertainty.

In recognition of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Celebration on January 19, 2009, the University of Guam School of Education student organization, Association for Childhood Education International (UOG-ACEI), is sponsoring an island-wide poster contest. The contest theme is Fulfilling the Dream. It is open to all public, private, and DODEA school children in K-12 grades. Posters must be submitted no later than Thursday, January 15, 2009 at UOG’s School of Education, second floor, between 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. See secretary Anita Palomo or contact her at 735-2440, atpalomo@uguam.uog.edu. Late entries will not be accepted.

The goal of the poster contest is to raise, enhance, and broaden awareness and knowledge levels of students about the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and about the significance and application of the major tenets of non-violence; and to look toward the future of the nation’s newest president, Barack Obama. The basic requirements for the poster include 9x12 inches (minimum size) to 12x18 inches (maximum size), any art medium, and no tracing. Criteria include technical skill, creativity, originality, theme adherence, aesthetics, and use of space. Students must include on the back of the poster their full name, age, grade, teacher, school, and contact number. The grade levels to be judged include Kindergarten to 2nd grade, 3rd to 5th grade, 6th to 8th grade, and 9th to 12th grade.

An exhibit of all posters will be displayed at the Agana Shopping Center beginning Saturday, January 17-19, 2009 and at UOG’s School of Education and RFK Library. Announcement of all winners will be January 19, 2009 at 12:00 p.m., Center Court, at the Agana Shopping Center.

Saturday, December 13, 2008

ESL Presentation: Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera presented an ESL workshop titled, "Using Graphic Organizers to Empower English Language Learners," during the International Reading Association’s “Engaging English Language Learners in Literacy” Professional Development Day on October 11, 2008 at the Guam Marriott Resort and Spa. She received a certificate of appreciation from the organization in recognition of service and valuable contribution.
UOG Distinguished Service Award: Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera was honored with the University of Guam Alumni Association Distinguished Service Award for 2007 for her exceptional volunteer work. She was selected by a panel of four judges, including Speaker Judith Won Pat; Col. James Montague, Commander Air Guard; Al Almira, Comptroller, TakeCare Asia; and Cathleen Moore-Linn, UOG Director of Integrated Marketing and Communications. Other nominees included School of Education Associate Professors Dr. Marilyn Malloy Jackson and Dr. Catherine Stoicovy.
Members of the GPSS ELL/ESL Standards Cadre 2008 presented the Guam English Language Proficiency Standards at the University of Guam’s 21st Annual Regional Language Arts Conference held November 14 and 15 at the University of Guam and Holiday Resort & Spa. The theme of the conference was Reading and Writing Across the Content Areas: Empowering English Language Learners. The cadre’s presentation titled Guam English Language Proficiency Standards (GELPS) introduced the English Language Standards that were developed for social, intercultural, and instructional purposes; language arts; mathematics; science; and social studies. The standards were developed to address the needs of GPSS English Language Learners, close the achievement gap for ELLs, and help ELLs attain English proficiency, or do the same for CHamoru Language Standards. An introduction of the Enhanced Assessment Grant (EAG) Project was also introduced to demonstrate the close relationship between the Standards and the EAG.

Cadre members who presented were Rosa Salas Palomo, Project Director/Coordinator of the Guam ESL Certification Plus Project; Zander David Refilong, Program Coordinator; Gene Dydasco, Education Specialist with the Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL); Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera, ESL Teacher/Coordinator with the Guam Public School System (GPSS) & adjunct professor for the Language and Literacy, TESOL, and Instructional Technology Programs & Department of English and Applied Linguistics at the University of Guam; Keith Juarez, Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) teacher with GPSS; and Guadalupe (Faye) Camacho Kaible, school program consultant with GPSS. Among the audience members who attended the presentation were Maydelene C. Ganan-Flores and Risa Jade S. Miguel, administrative staff of the Micronesian Language Institute; Menang Diaz, GPSS State Program Officer; GPSS teachers Bobbie Manibusan, Dawn Maka, Cynthia Manibusan & Vina Johnson. Cadre members not pictured are Dr. Margo Gottlieb, LN494/G Instructor & Illinois Resource Center; Lucia C. Leon Guerrero, GPSS School Administrator; Chamoru teachers Teresita C. Flores, Cecilia C. Bermudes, Marilyn R. Perez, Roy M. Leon Guerrero, Jocelyn T.Santos, Rufina F. Mendiola; June E. Taitano from GPSS Special Education; Kirk S. Drygas from Project Hatsa; Dr. Jose Q. Cruz from the Guam Education Policy Board; GPSS ESL teachers, Lois Taitano Gumataotao, Lorena M. Montague, Priscilla C.T. Perez, Melissa R. Pablo, and Marife G. Fernandez.

Saturday, December 06, 2008

Presentation: Undergraduate students enrolled in the EN100 Fundamentals of College English course completed the semester on December 2, 2008 with a presentation of their creative writing projects. The course is an integrated reading and writing course that prepares students for further English courses and further study at the University.

Pictured L-R front row: Pictured L-R front row: Francis Manuel, Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera, and Michael Figuerres. Back row: Ikol Suda, Christiana Cruz, JovieAnn Quitugua, Maria Machie, Kristine Pabunan, Cheysser Rodriguez, and Keith Guerrero.
Language and Literacy Master of Education students enrolled in the ED643 Literacy Assessment course completed the semester on December 1, 2008 with a presentation of their online LiveText Portfolio and Diagnostic Case Report at the University of Guam’s School of Education Literacy Center. The course focuses on using a range of formal and informal assessment tools and methods to diagnose and assess individual learners’ reading and writing development, to guide instruction, and to involve the learner in self-assessment.

Pictured L-R: Lorna Gonzalez; Kate Pappano; Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera, instructor; Lucille Linder; and Ceferino Duarosan Jr.
University of Guam School of Education professors presented at the university’s 21st Annual Regional Language Arts Conference held November 14 and 15 at the University of Guam and Holiday Resort & Spa. The theme of the conference was Reading and Writing Across the Content Areas: Empowering English Language Learners. The professors’ presentation titled Jumpstarting Reading Comprehension for English Language Learners introduced the reader’s schema and its importance in comprehending, learning, and remembering ideas in stories and text.

Pictured L-R: Dr. Kate Mastruserio Reynolds, conference keynote speaker and associate professor of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages in the departments of foreign languages and curriculum and instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire; Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera, Dr. Catherine Stoicovy, Dr. Kelle Murphy, and Professor Julie Fee (sitting) from the University of Guam.
Graduate students enrolled in ED638: Teaching with the Internet presented at the University of Guam’s 21st Annual Regional Language Arts Conference held November 14 and 15 at the University of Guam and Holiday Resort & Spa. The theme of the conference was Reading and Writing Across the Content Areas: Empowering English Language Learners. The students’ presentation titled Using Internet Tools to Enhance ESL Instruction explored web sites aimed at enhancing ESL and content area instruction, writing, collaboration, professional development, instructional technology, website designing, blogging, and assessment.

Pictured L-R: Paul Sekine; Ceferino Duarosan Jr.; Dr. Kate Mastruserio Reynolds, conference keynote speaker and associate professor of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages in the departments of foreign languages and curriculum and instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire; Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera, instructor; Kate Pappano; and Gregory Mamay.

Hafa Adai! It has been a pleasure sharing the various cultural poems from the anthology Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People. Today marks the last day of sharing the poems, as we’ve finally reached Korasón Poem #57, the last poem contained in the anthology. In this poem, titled Delicious Pumpkin Treats, you’ll experience the virtual taste of our pumpkin treats of Buchi Buchi and pastet. I hope you’ll enjoy it! Si Yu’os Ma’ase’!

Delicious Pumpkin Treats

Buchi Buchi or pumpkin pastet* –
What’s the difference?
They’re both made almost the same way
And they taste so delicious –
I can’t even tell the difference.
Okay, so I can, but why should it matter?
The only difference is the way it’s cooked.
Buchi Buchi is fried pumpkin turnover
While regular pumpkin turnover is baked.
They’re both made of sweet dough and pumpkin filling
And it takes about an hour or so
To cook a dozen of them.
These are among my favorite deserts
And I’m sure if you try them you’ll agree with me
That they are delicious pumpkin treats!
Gof manngé!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*pastet: turnover
*Gof manngé: Tastes very good.

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao
Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #56 titled Ahu. Enjoy!

Ahu

One of my favorite desserts
Is the delicious ahu
Which is grated coconut boiled in sugar water.
It is one that will make your mouth water
As you smell the aroma of it being cooked.
With just one helping you’ll soon see
That you’ll find yourself
Coming back for some more to eat.
When going to a fiesta
There’s sure to be
That appetizing ahu for all to enjoy.
If you haven’t tried ahu yet
You’re missing out on this coconut soup treat
Because it’s one dessert that can’t be beat!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Tuesday, December 02, 2008

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #55 titled Carving. Enjoy!

Carving

Carving is a special art that one must be trained in
For it’s not easy to carve a coconut or a tool
Especially when dealing with sharp objects.

Carving a galaidé* is also no easy task
But the master carver knows
How to skillfully build it
Despite the difficulty.

Carving is indeed an art I appreciate
And one that is extraordinary
With the wondrous pieces one can create.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

* galaidé: canoe

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Monday, December 01, 2008

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #54 titled Ko’ko. Enjoy!

Ko’ko’

The Ko’ko’, Guam’s Territorial Bird,
Is an endangered species
Believe it or not.

It’s hard to imagine
That there aren’t that many that can be found
For I remember seeing them as a child.
I can recall
How the bird had a brown head, neck and eye stripe
With a near gray throat and upper breast.
It also had short, dark-colored wings
With brownish spots barred with white.
It possessed a breast, abdomen and tail
Which were blackish with white barrings
It also had a gray bill, red iris, long legs
Along with dark brown feet.

Well, those were features of the Ko’ko’
That I vividly remember
Which would often scatter when I passed by.
It is one special bird that I knew couldn’t fly
But it is one that I would always remember
Because it had a loud, piercing whistle
Whenever it would sing.

It is said that the brown tree snakes invaded Guam
And is responsible for eating most of the Ko’ko.
We must protect whatever Ko’ko that are alive
For if we don’t, there will come a time
When this special native bird of Guam
Will disappear right before our eyes.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Ko’ko: Guam rail

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao
Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #53 titled Santa Marian Kamalen. Enjoy!

Santa Marian Kamalen

Every year on December 8
You can bet my family and I would go
To the Dulce Nombre de Maria Cathedral Basilica
To attend the procession which would last for hours.
And though my feet would ache from all the walking
My faith in God remains strong and always will.

According to the legend
Santa Marian Kamalen floated
Into the shores of Malesso
Escorted by two crabs with lit votive candles.
It is said that her travel in the waters is a miracle
Since she is made of ironwood, which does not float.
She was brought in by a fisherman
Who presented her to the Spanish Governor.
It is said that the fisherman drew near to the statue
But it drifted away until he fully clothed himself.
The statue was then housed in a proa shed or camarin
Until she moved to her new home
At the Dulce Nombre de Maria Cathedral Basilica.

Santa Marian Kamalen,
Patroness of the island,
Who has survived typhoons, earthquakes, and WWII,
Stands watch over the people of Guam.
And my participation in honoring Santa Marian Kamalen
Will remain a tradition of mine
For as long as I’m able to walk, talk and sing
I will continue to attend the procession,
As well as pray and sing wholeheartedly.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Santa Marian Kamalen: Our Lady of Camarin

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Thursday, November 20, 2008



Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #52 titled Y Prensa. Enjoy!

Y Prensa

I remember my mother telling me
How she used y prensa* to iron her clothes
Because back then
There was no such thing as an electric iron.
She’d have to go get tesson*
Which would be burning inside the iron
Releasing the heat
That would be used to press the clothes.
Y prensa,
A small, yet heavy household appliance
Carefully crafted out of iron,
Is no longer used today.
But it’s a reminder of Guam’s past
Of how our people were resourceful
And they made do with what they had.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*y prensa: iron
*tesson: fire stick

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Tan Floren 's woven creations

Image source: http://www.pacificworlds.com

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #51 titled Weaving. Enjoy!

Weaving

Weaving with coconut leaves
Was a part of the Chamorro culture
Before and during the Japanese occupation.
Our people would tufok* baskets
For fishing and to hold things in
And they would also weave
Many other things such as the
Guafak* to sleep on
Higai* to provide shelter
Purses to keep items in
Bohao* to keep themselves cool
Katupat* for cooking rice
And decorations for fiestas.
Weaving is used to this day
And I hope that it is one art that won’t go away.

© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*tufok: weave
*Guafak: mat
*Higai: Roof of coconut palm
*Bohao: Fan
*Katupat: woven container used for cooking rice

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Sunday, November 16, 2008

Image source: http://www.guampedia.com/



Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #50 titled Fanihi. Enjoy!

Fanihi

On Guam there’s a very special animal we call fanihi*.
It’s a delicacy for many
For I recall how my parents would crave for it.
They would get so excited
Whenever they were able to catch one
Just so that they can eat it with delight.
As for me
Well, I don’t necessarily crave for it
For one would have to acquire its odor
Of a skunk-like smell.
And one would also have to be accustomed
To looking at the blaring, bulging eyes
Of a fury, flying mouse-like creature.
And if you go to a fiesta
Who knows,
You just might come across a fanihi
That’ll greet you with that unique odor
And those unique eyes.
But don’t let it frighten you
For you just might like him
Just as my parents do and no doubt, always will.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Fanihi: fruit bat

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Saturday, November 15, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #49 titled Belembao Tuyan. Enjoy!

Belembao Tuyan

Our culture is rich with music and dance
And one thing that makes it lively
Is the belembao tuyan* which will delight your ears
With its distinctive sounds
That are uniquely generated by one’s stomach

There aren’t that many
Who can play the belembao tuyan with ease
But when it is played you can bet
It will merrily entertain you
With a cultural tune that can’t be matched.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*belembao tuyan: musical string instrument which is held against the belly while the musician plays.


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Friday, November 14, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #48 titled Tapon Dia. Enjoy!

Tapon Dia

Saturday was my family’s Tapon Dia.
As low tide came around
We went to the beach to harvest clam all day long.
We would use our fingers
To dig deep into the sand.
And we would pick as many clams as we could.

Clam after clam we all would harvest
Clam after clam we all would spread out
We would dig and dig
Until our bucket was filled with clams.

But the best thing of all is eating the clams
After it has been washed and boiled with coconut milk
For eating the cooked clams with hot rice
Is a well deserved treat!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

* Tapon Dia: Clam Day


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Wednesday, November 12, 2008



Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #47 titled Kahit. Enjoy!

Kahit

I enjoy eating kahit or orange as we know it
For it was one of my favorite fruits
As a child and still is to this day.
When August rolled around the corner
I knew it was orange harvest time once again.

I remember how my brothers, sister and I
Would scramble around to pick the oranges
That suddenly all came falling down
After my dad hit all the tree branches with utmost force.
And if we weren’t careful enough
To dodge the falling oranges
We’d sometimes get hit on our backs, arms or legs.

Although it was hard work to pick all the oranges
I tried my best to fill up my sack to the very top
So that I may peel and enjoy
As many oranges to eat with much delight!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*kahit: orange

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Saturday, November 08, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #46 titled Biba Kumple Años. Enjoy!

Biba Kumple Años*

Every year there comes a Special Day
Once a year for each of us
To celebrate our Birthday!

When that Special Day came we knew what to expect
As we would go to Sizzlers to feast and enjoy
And be greeted by a group of jolly people
Who would loudly sing,
Happy Birthday to You! Happy Birthday to You!
As they delivered a delicious treat
Topped with a lighted candle
To make that Special Birthday Wish.

When that moment came
All eyes would be on the Birthday Celebrant
Who would be caught off guard
And literally turn red as a lobster.
Until the singing stopped
And the onlookers turned away.

I still remember those Special Days…
I call it the Sizzlers Moment –
For it’s a moment we shared many times at Sizzlers.
And though Sizzlers is no longer on Guam
The memories will always be cherished
And we’ll continue to create
Other moments at a Special Place
For that Special Day
Held once a year
To celebrate our Birthday!
Biba Kumple Años!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Biba Kumple Años: Happy Birthday

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Thursday, November 06, 2008


Hafa Adai!
As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #45 titled Chenchulé yan Ika. Enjoy!


Chenchulé yan Ika

One of the things I appreciate in our culture

Is the chenchulé system

For it’s one that has assisted my family in times of need.

I remember when my Tata passed away,

Hundreds of people gathered in support

To assist in his burial,

Not only emotionally but financially as well.

Many people gave ika,

Such as delicious food for the rosaries,

Or money to help our family.


I was amazed at the countless people

Who paid their respects –

A sign of a valuable relationship

That will always be remembered.

I’ve been told by my parents

That the chenchulé given

Was part of a reciprocal connection

For various good deeds my Tata had done

To help others while he was still alive.

It brightens my spirit to know

That if any big event may occur,

Whether it be a funeral, wedding, or christening,

I know there will be that network

Of financial and emotional support.

© mnrivera and ltgumataotao


*chenchulé: present (money), donation, thing that is given away, gift.
*ika: donation, gift – given to the family of a deceased person.

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Wednesday, November 05, 2008



Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #44 titled Belen. Enjoy!

Belen

During Christmas time,
I’m reminded of the belen* or nativity scene
That my family and I worked hard to put together,
Yet with gentle care.
In preparation, we would go out to the deep jungle
In our village of Malesso
And pick the moss a certain way,
So that we could create
Our very own special little town of Bethlehem
That would be displayed for days.
We would carefully decorate
Our belen with the Niño, Mary, Joseph
But that’s not all –
There were also the shepard, manger animals;
Not too mention the drummer boys, angels
And, of course, the three kings
To add that special touch of a glorious nativity scene.

When our belen was set up
We were all set to go
For I knew we were ready to begin praying the novena*
And sing songs for nine days.
And though the years have gone by, I’m happy to say
That our tradition
Of building the belen and praying the novena remains.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*belen: nativity scene
*novena: nine-day series of prayer
*Niño: statue of the baby Jesus

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Tuesday, November 04, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #43 titled Boi Boi. Enjoy!

Boi Boi

Boi Boi was the name of our pet ga’lagu*
That we loved to play with
Day in and day out
From dusk ‘til dawn
In our little, yet loving house in Malesso.

We took him to the ranch to run and play with
And I remember how he looked graceful,
Yet cute as he swam swiftly in the river there
With his feet paddling in a rhythmic fashion.
I remember how we walked him for hours
All around the yard
Snuggling against him
First as a little, loveable pup
And eventually as a grown
And admirable dog we grew to love.

Though we fed him leftovers from all our meals
Many times we also prepared
A special family plate just for him –
Leftovers or not.
You see, he was part of our family.
He protected us from strangers
As he barked loudly without warning
To anyone who approached our home
Especially at night.
He was sensitive to the sirens
That went off in the village –
Poor Boi Boi –
I hated it when that happened
For I knew his ears were hurting from the sound.

And now that the years have gone by
And I’m all grown up with meaningful memories to share
I can tell you that there was one special pet in my life –
My first special pet that my family shared
And his name is the one and only, “Boi Boi!”
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*ga’lagu: dog

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Monday, November 03, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #42 titled Dos Chelus. Enjoy!

Dos Chelus

Who could believe I’d have two lovable brothers?
One is just a year older than me
And the other is two years younger.

I admit that my brothers were literally brats at times
And I loved it when they got in trouble for picking on me.
But as the years went by, things changed.

Sure, they were the ones who hid my dolls
And often they teased and pulled my hair
But I learned to forgive them
For they turned out to be my heroes in life.

I remember one day at Merizo Elementary School
When a bully pulled my hair to get my lunch money.
You kicked that bully from behind
And she never picked on me from that day on.

My Dos Chelus*
Though you got in trouble for doing that
You both said,
“It was well worth it, because you’re our blood.”

Well, that was 28 years ago,
And I’ll never forget that moment.
I’ll never forget how my feelings changed
And how you both changed as well
Becoming grown men I’ve learned to admire
And remembering that you taught me
How family is so dear.
I love you my Dos Chelus!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Dos Chelus: Two Brothers

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Saturday, November 01, 2008

Image source: http://www.guampedia.com/


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #41 titled Taotaomo’na and Duhendes. Enjoy!

The Taotaomo’na and Duhendes

Our elders have always told us to be careful
Especially to stay indoors when it’s late at night.
They remind us to ask permission
Whenever we do step on ancestry land
So that we do not get punished from the taotaomo’na*
They say that big eyes will watch you
Or you might get pinched.
And you may even begin to feel haunting shadows
That follow you around
Fearing you with a creepy sound.
They say you can feel little eyes
Who may be watching you from behind a bush
And low-toned voices from the duhendes*
So be careful if you’re at the boonies, especially at night
Or the taotaomo’na and duhendes may frighten you!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*taotaomo’na: ghost; people of before
*duhendes: goblin, elf, ghost in the form of a dwarf


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Sunday, October 19, 2008

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #40 titled Sister Dear. Enjoy!

Sister Dear

Who could imagine that I’d have a sister like you?
A sister I admire and happen to love too.
Although you’re three years younger than me
I’ve learned so much from you, My Dear Chelu*
I’ve learned that having a sister can be so wonderful
Having someone to lean on when I’m feeling blue
Having someone to confide my secrets with
And just knowing that I am not alone.

Remember when you were 10 and I was 13?
I told you to give Nana* the strawberries
Which was topped with whip cream.
Well, she never saw whip cream in her whole life
And she thought it was shaving cream!
Remember when I saw dad kissing mom on the porch?
We couldn’t help but laugh and you shouted,
“Oh my gosh! Look!”

I admit that we’ve had our fights
We even called each other disgusting names.
Yet we somehow always managed
To suddenly be friends once again,
And, without a doubt,
Be the best friends sisters could be!

So Sister Dear
Remember that I’ll always remember
The precious times we’ve shared
And you will always hold a special place in my heart.
I love you girl!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Chelu: sister, *Nana: mother


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Saturday, October 11, 2008

San Dimas Church, Malesso, Guam

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #39 titled Catholic Church Gatherings. Enjoy!

Catholic Church Gatherings

Every Sunday morning we attend the early mass
With parishioners that fill up the pews in minutes.
It is a well known fact that if you come too late
You’ll often find yourself standing
Sometimes at the back of the church.
During mass you’ll see all sorts of people, rich or poor
Single or married with children.
You’ll also see both old and young alike
Who have been brought up going to church
And have made it a ritual of theirs.
You’ll find old women in their mestisa*
Who often wear rosary beads
And you may even hear some nenis* crying.
But no matter who we see or what people wear
Everyone joins together
As one big Catholic Christian family.
Our people have been Catholics for generations
And it is evident that no one can take away
Our strong Catholic faith.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*mestisa: cultural outfit usually worn by elder women for religious or formal ceremonies
*nenis: babies

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Thursday, October 09, 2008

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #38 titled Funerals. Enjoy!

Funerals

Losing a loved one is tough
Especially if you’re part of the immediate family.
I remember when my Tata* died
I had to wear a red outfit
As well as my brothers and and my sister.
My mom and dad wore black
Along with my tihus yan tihas*.
I didn’t shed a tear
Because I wanted to show everyone I was strong
But that didn’t last for too long.
It was one of the saddest moments in my life
Because the time had come for me to say goodbye.
Adios Tata*
Adios yan memorias
I know I’ll meet you some day
When my time comes to join you in heaven above.

© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Tata: father
*tihus yan tihas: uncles and aunts
*Adios Tata: Goodbye father
*Adios yan memorias: Goodbye and memories.

Note: Although Tata literally translates to father, in this poem, it is affectionately referred to such for grandfather, based on her personal experience.


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Wednesday, October 08, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #37 titled Chonka. Enjoy!

Chonka

As a child I remember one game that I often played
Chonka was the name of the game.
I would play it with my brother
For hours on end
As we’d take a handful of shells and place it
Into the carved cups of the wooden tray
Over and over again.
Chonka…
I don’t play it as often as I used to
But I do have fond memories
Of playing with this special game
And perhaps we can bring it back into our lives, Someday.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Saturday, October 04, 2008

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #36 titled Empanada. Enjoy!

Empanada

I love that fried, tasty orange-colored empanada
Filled with what tastes
Like a scrumptious chalakiles* dish.
I’m talking about that snack that’s shaped like a turnover
Which is actually made of dough
And also toasted ground rice.
But why is it colored orange, some may ask –
That’s simply because
The ingredients are colored with achoti seeds*
So the next time you go to a fiesta
Or even a mom-and-pop store
Look for that delicious orange-colored empanada
And savor its delicious taste!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*chalakiles: rice porridge; orange-colored stew-like dish made with toasted ground rice
*achoti seeds: seeds used for coloring rice and other foods

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #35 titled Suruhana. Enjoy!

Suruhana

In my family the spiritual stories remain alive
Of my great grandmother,
Antonia Chargualaf Nangauta,
Who served as the village suruhana* of Malesso.
I’ve been told of how she would cure the sick
By giving them herbs to eat or drink
Or maybe even massage them.
Yet I was also told that when she healed someone
The sickness imposed by the spirit would transfer to her
So she, too, would have to drink herbs to cure herself.
She often instructed those inflicted with sickness
To visit the site where their illness began
And ask for forgiveness for disturbing the spirits.

So if you enter the jungle
Be careful not to disturb the taotaomo’na*.
Ask for permission from the Guela yan Guelo*
Before you begin your travel
So that you may not get sick, pinched, get red marks
Or even swell.
This is because, although the suruhana is revered,
There aren’t that many that can be found these days,
For, they too, grow of old age,
Just like my great grandmother
Who has since passed away.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*suruhana: female herb doctor
*taotaomo’na: ghost; people of before
*Guela yan Guelo : grandmother and grandfather

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Friday, October 03, 2008

Two Lovers Leap Statue, Tumon Bay, Guam



Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #34 titled The Two Lovers. Enjoy!

The Two Lovers

There’s a legend they say
About two young Chamorro lovers
Who jumped to their death at Puntan Dos Amantes*
All in the name of love.
Their story goes something like this –
There once lived a beautiful Chamorro maiden
Who caught the eye of every young man in the village.
Although her father wanted to dictate her marriage
To a rich Spanish captain
She was in love with a young native boy.
And despite her parents disapproval
She met secretly with her lover.
But enough was enough
When her parents had arranged for her marriage
To the Spanish captain she did not care for.
So the two lovers ran away
But they never came home.
They tied their hairs together as a symbol of love
And both jumped off the cliff of Tumon Bay.
They say soldiers were sent to search for the maiden
But all they saw for a brief moment
Were floating hairs that disappeared in seconds.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Puntan Dos Amantes: Two Lovers’ Point

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Thursday, October 02, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #33 titled Y Kareta Hu – Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Enjoy!

Y Kareta Hu –
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang


“Chitty Chitty, Bang! Bang!,”
I sometimes say to myself.
For in our family
We had our own very special, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
I remember that it was a Mazda B-2200 pickup
That we kids shared.
It was color black
With bangs here and there
From left to right
With bruises and scratches –
Evidence of our joyful and fearful rides.

It was our Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
That we all used for our first drive
To take to school
To do errands from Yigo to Malesso.
To place our loveable nenis in,
As cramped as we were.
Yet, it was also our Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
That we got our first car accident in
As we slammed another car
On a slippery and wet road one terrible day.
It was our Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
That my brothers had backed up with
As they slammed into a wall
Carelessly rushing to get somewhere.
I remember how we tried to cover up
The damages on our Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
As we cleaned inside and outside of our house
Making it sparkling clean
With an aroma of spring freshness
While also cooking up a superb and delicious treat.
Though my parents were delighted
With our household efforts
It was not too long
Before they realized what we had done
To our Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.
Those were the days…

You know,
We’ve had a lot of special memories
With our Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.
And though he’s gone in Auto Heaven now
I will always remember him –
Here’s to our good ‘ole Chitty Chitty Bang Bang!
Y kareta hu!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*nenis: babies
*Y kareta hu: My car


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #32 titled Mangga. Enjoy!

Mangga

I remember the mangga* days
When we would pick mango as a family.
When mango season came along
We knew the mangos would be abundant
And that we’d have to get to work.

We had to pick the mangos from our 20 trees
That my dad would skillfully climb on.
When he reached the top of the trees
He would hit the branches with all his might
As the mangos came falling down
Like huge and heavy raindrops
That sometimes hit our backs and arms
If we didn’t dodge them as they came our way.

I still remember the mangga days
And how we would fill our sacks with delicious mangos
To eat as much as we wanted
And to sell to the market.
Those mangga days are gone now
But they will never be forgotten.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Mangga: mango

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #31 titled Wedding. Enjoy!

Wedding

The umakamo’* is a memorable event –
Just look at the nobia*
She’s dressed up in a lovely, glimmering, white dress.
Her name is Juanita
And she’s as beautiful as can be.
And look at Miguel
He’s the most handsome nobiu* I’ve ever seen.
He’s dressed in a black suit that has just been pressed.
But aside from the nobia and nobiu
You’ll notice the band playing a cha-cha song.
Everyone is dancing to the beat of Nobia Kahulo*
And are happy as can be.
But, oh, look at that gorgeous table setting
With ruffle decorations and a lovely lace table cover.
There you can find some delicious fiesta food
Like hot kelaguen, steaming red rice, barbecue chicken,
And so much more!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*umakamo’: wedding
*nobia: bride
*nobiu: groom
*Nobia Kahulo: Chamorro wedding song meaning, Bride Wake Up


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Sunday, September 28, 2008

UOG-ACEI Induction Ceremony: Senator Judi Won-Pat conducted the 2008-2009 induction ceremony for the University of Guam Association for Childhood Education International (UOG-ACEI) for their new officers and advisors on Wednesday, September 24, 2008, at the School of Education . Many ACEI members, students, friends, and faculty members attended. Several community and civic organizations and agencies who partnership with UOG-ACEI were invited to attend and participate in the ceremony.Pictured front row L-R: Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera, ACEI Advisor; Dr. Marilyn Malloy Jackson, ACEI Advisor; Senator Judi Won-Pat, and Dr. Anita Borja-Enriquez, Executive Director for the School of Business and Public Administration. Back row L-R: Alicia Quintanilla, President; Ewalani Escruplo, Vice President; Beauty Letewasiyal, Secretary; Kimberly Castro, Treasurer; Vaughn Blas, Public Relations Officer; and Nakita Braganza, Public Relations Officer.
Staff Development: St. Anthony Catholic School teachers completed a 5-day workshop titled, "Middle School Reading and Writing in the Content Areas" on September 24, 2008. Pictured front row L-R: Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera, instructor; and Josephine Catahay, St. Anthony Catholic School NCLB Representative. Back row L-R: Agnes Pocaigue, Martha Castro, Dominic Gumataotao, Maricon Reyes, and Eileen Gofigan.

Saturday, September 27, 2008

When a family member has cancer, it can be shocking and tragic for all members. I am grateful that my mother, Julia Santos Naputi, has survived cancer, and will be able to spend Mother’s Day with us. She lives life to the fullest each day, and cherishes the time she spends with family and friends.


L-R: Julia Naputi Rivera, Joaquin Naputi, Joaquin “Kinny” N.A. Rivera, Julia Naputi, Novalei & Isabella. Back row: Matilda Naputi Rivera, Jose, Lahna, Felicia, Joaquin Jr. & Fausto Naputi Rivera III.

Story in the Pacific Daily News:


Full Story from the Pacific Daily News:

When a family member is stricken with cancer, it can be shocking and tragic for all members. Today I am grateful that my mother, Julia Santos Naputi, has survived cancer, and will be able to spend Mother’s Day with us. My family is blessed that she arrived safely from San Diego yesterday evening.

It has been emotional and challenging especially for my father, Joaquin Nangauta Naputi, who is my mother’s caretaker. I see the love that he possesses, as he takes the time to cook for her, take her to the hospital for chemotheraphy and radiation treatments, and so much more.

My mother says that she is at ease with her circumstances because her eyes are open to the good of God, which is always present. She releases what she cannot change and makes wise choices in areas where she can. She is grateful for her life and the abundance present within it. She is grateful to all my family and friends for their concern, love, caring, masses, and prayers.

On January 2006, she was diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer (nose and throat cancer). Small nodules were found on the left and right side of her neck area. She was scared. She wondered why this happened when things were going great in her life. She was the Area Manager for General Nutrition Center. She did aerobics daily and dutifully took her vitamins.

The three months of radiation and chemotherapy weakened her body, and she lost 30 pounds. With my father’s undying support and caring, affection from families and friends, many prayers and masses on Guam and San Diego, she made it through. Then on September 2006, three small swellings were noticed on her lungs. A series of cat scan, pet scan and biopsies revealed it was growing. On March 2007, she went through the chemotherapy regiment again. As always, families and friends rallied to support her.

On this Mother’s Day, my mother wishes to give thanks to family and friends for their continued prayers. It is a circumstance in her life she has to deal with. She works hard to nourish her positive state of mind through daily exercise, prayers, and creation of gifts and souvenirs. Working on various gifts and souvenirs keeps her occupied. Otherwise, she would dwell on her cancer. She lives life to the fullest each day, cherishes the time she spends with family and friends, and leaves things in God’s hands.


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #30 titled Karabao. Enjoy!

Karabao

The karabao* has rough and heavy skin
And loves to chew on the grass so long and green.
The karabao loves to swim in the bay
And would enjoy swimming there all day.
And though the karabao is strong and powerful
They may be a thing of the past
If we do not take care of them today.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*karabao: water buffalo, carabao

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #29 titled Lancho. Enjoy!

Lancho

Early in the morning my mom and dad
Would go out in the field of our lancho*
In that hot, glaring sun
They would work even harder.
When I see drops of sweat fall from their forehead
I can tell it’s time to give them a glass of ice-cold water.
They grow various golai*
Guam residents love to eat –
Cucumbers, eggplants, tomatoes, and beans.

Farming is a family event too
For my brothers, my sister, and I also help my parents.
We hand them a shovel or two
And help them pick golai that are ready to eat.
Farming is hard work
But it’s something that must be done
To put food on the table for all of us.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*lancho: ranch
*golai: vegetables

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #28 titled Fishing. Enjoy!

Fishing

It’s six o’clock in the morning
And I can hear my father gathering his fishing gear.
Yesterday he caught 10 palakse’*
But they were so lean
Perhaps tomorrow he’ll have a better catch.
His favorite place to fish is at the Tumon reef
But sometimes he fishes at Agana with his pare*
He told me today that he would get a good catch
And I believe him because he said the sky told him so.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*pare: close friend, *palakse’: parrot fish

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #27 titled Pugua’. Enjoy!

Pugua’

Pugua’* is a special nut
We chew with delight.
Whether it be Ugum or Chungă
It has a unique flavor
And is especially tasty with Pupulu leaves!
It’ll spark your energy
And keep you moving
In all that you do!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*pugua’: betel nut

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #26 titled SPAM. Enjoy!

SPAM

SPAM is our island’s instant Chamorro steak.
It’s truly a national mainstay
For our people consume it more than any other meat.

Introduced by the Americans during the war
It has survived the test of time
And today remains a staple for many.

We even hold a SPAM Olympics
To explore new SPAM recipes
Filled with zesty and spicy flavor
That we can taste and enjoy!

SPAM…Guam’s adopted Chamorro steak
Tastes especially good when it’s pika*
Combined with steaming red rice
And an ice-cold drink!
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*pika: hot (spicy)

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Monday, September 22, 2008



Hafa Adai!
As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #24 titled Sirena. Enjoy!


Sirena

There’s a popular legend we have here on Guam

Of a beautiful and young native girl

Who had lovely long, black hair.

Her name was Sirena and she was a playful girl

Who loved to swim all day long.

When sent out to do errands

You can bet

She’d first take a swim in the river.

It’s been told that one day

Sirena's mother became very impatient

For she couldn’t stand Sirena swimming most of the day

When errands had to be done.

So one day came when she cursed Sirena into a fish.

But thanks to Sirena’s nina*

The curse was stopped halfway.

To this day, we hear about Sirena,

As a beautiful creature – half woman and half fish.

Her mother never saw her again

And wished she never said the curse

For tears of sadness flowed endlessly

As Sirena disappeared among the waves.

They say that Sirena has visited different places

Where she stopped vessels that came her way.

And it is believed

That this beautiful creature can be caught

Only with a net made of human hair.

© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*nina: godmother

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Saturday, September 20, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #23 titled Aga’. Enjoy!


Aga'

My favorite fruit is aga’* or banana as we know it.

We grew many banana trees on our Malesso lancho*

And you would always find some aga’

On our wooden kitchen table.

My mom made bunelos aga’* and madoya*

That made my mouth water

Just by the smell of them being cooked.

And eating the aga’ plain doesn’t bother me at all

Because it’s the easiest dessert I can grab to eat.

So, if ever you want a simple dessert to eat

Why not pick up an aga’ treat?

© mnrivera and ltgumataotao


*aga’: banana (ripe)

*lancho: ranch

*bunelos aga’: banana doughnuts

*bonelos aga: banana donuts

*madoya: fried banana dessert made with a mixture of flour, milk, and eggs


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Friday, September 19, 2008


Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #22 titled Latte Stones. Enjoy!

Latte Stones

The Latte* Stones are archaeological wonders
Said to be used as pillars
For the foundation of homes.
How did they come to be?
Those huge, unique mounded stones are heavy
With one heavy stone placed on top of another.
Who chose the shape?
Who shaped the stones?
The answers are there for all to imagine
As we reflect on the days of our ancestors.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Latte: stone pillar for building

Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao

Monday, September 15, 2008

My Guela

Hafa Adai! As part of my commitment to continue to share cultural poems relating to our beautiful island of Guam and its people, here’s Korasón Poem #25 titled Guela Dear. Enjoy!

Guela Dear

Guela* Dear
I love you so
For being there for all of us, always.

Our babysitter
Our instant Bible
Our master chef
Our shopaholic
Our Santa Claus all year long.
The list goes on,
My Guela Dear.
But no matter what
We will always treasure
How you loved us with all your heart and soul!

So, if I haven’t told you lately
I want you to know
That we all love you,
We truly do…
And we’ll never forget
How you shaped our lives
To be true to ourselves and others
And strive to live by God’s Word, in all that we do.
© mnrivera and ltgumataotao

*Guela: Grandma


Source: Our Native Daughters’ Reflection of Guam and Its People by Dr. Matilda Naputi Rivera and Lois Taitano Gumataotao